By Lizzie Vasquez

Healthy urine is typically pale yellow in color. If you have noticed a pink or red hue in your urine, you could have blood in your urine (hematuria), which could indicate a disorder and should not be ignored.

According to the Mayo Clinic, there are two types of hematuria. Blood you can see is gross hematuria — what an appropriate name! It produces pink- or red-colored urine due to the presence of red blood cells and is not usually painful. Microscopic hematuria is urinary blood that is only visible under a microscope and is found when your urine is tested. Bloody urine can often occur without other symptoms, so it is important to talk with your doctor to find the cause of bleeding.

Blood in urine can come from the kidneys. Urine is made in the kidney and could be a sign of kidney infection (pyelonephritis). This occurs when bacteria enter kidneys from the bloodstream. Kidney infections are likely to cause fever and flank pain, according to the Mayo Clinic.

Another disorder that can cause blood in urine is a urinary tract infection, which is caused by blood entering the body through the urethra. The bacteria multiply in your bladder and causes a persistent urge to urinate, pain and burning with urination, and strong-smelling urine.

There is no specific treatment for hematuria, because it is a symptom and not a specific condition. Talk with your doctor to get treatment aimed at the underlying cause if one can be found. In some cases, no treatment is necessary.

But, wait! Urine that is reddish or pink in color could be due to eating certain foods. Beets, blackberries and rhubarb can temporarily give urine a red or pink hue, so before you rush to the doctor, think back on what you have recently eaten to be sure your diet is not to blame for your off-color urine.