Power of a Positive Mind

By Amanda Roland

There are some that see the glass as half full. Other, see it half empty. For those that see it full, they don’t see anything negative about missing the other half, they only appreciate the half that is there. In other words, they see the positive side of the glass contents! The power of positivity does play a roll in our health and longevity. How we choose to harness that positivity is at our fingertips! Embrace the positive, it will do you some good!

How to add some positivity into your world:

POSITIVE COLORS

Ever walk outside to get some sun? Have you been attracted to bright and colorful sunflowers, daisies or sweet lemonade? The color yellow is known as the happy color! It is considered cheerful and optimistic. Adding a dose of yellow to your office, room or wardrobe can do wonders for your positivity.

LET GO OF ANGER

According to Everyday Health, chronic anger can increase your chances of having a heart-attack or stroke, not to mention it can also weaken your immune system. Anger can also lead to an increase in anxiety and depression which can leave people feeling isolated and alone, causing more anger. It unnecessarily becomes a vicious cycle.

LET’S HEAR IT

Birds chirping, harps playing or even the waves crashing. We all have a list of soothing sounds that make us happy, even if it is our children reading their favorite stories to us or talking to our best friend on the phone. The power of sound to increase our happiness and comfort can have a positive effect on keeping us calm, balanced and focused.

POSITIVE OUTLOOK ON AGING

Everyone changes as they age, but according to Psychology Today, “how we choose to define, view and accept the changes is crucial to our ability to ‘age gracefully.’ Positive aging allows us to weather the expected and unexpected changes we experience.” Embracing change is hard at times, especially when it is related to our own aging and how we are changing. But, a simple shift in mindset on our own life path can have a positive impact on the way we value
our days and how we spend them.

BY NICOLE IRVING